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November 3, 2020 — California General Election
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State of California
Proposition 14 — Stem Cell Research Bond Measure - Majority Approval Required

To learn more about measures, follow the links for each tab in this section. For most screenreaders, you can hit Return or Enter to enter a tab and read the content within.

AUTHORIZES BONDS CONTINUING STEM CELL RESEARCH. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

Authorizes $5.5 billion state bonds for: stem cell and other medical research, including training; research facility construction; administrative costs. Dedicates $1.5 billion to brain-related diseases. Appropriates General Fund moneys for repayment. Expands related programs.

Fiscal Impact: Increased state costs to repay bonds estimated at about $260 million per year over the next roughly 30 years. 

Put on the Ballot by Petition Signatures

What is this proposal?

Easy Voter Guide — Summary for new and busy voters

Information provided by The League of Women Voters of California Education Fund

The way it is now

Stem cells are a special type of human cell that is used for medical research. They can grow into many different types of cells, such as brain cells or heart cells. Stem cells are used to find treatments for many kinds of diseases. In 2004, California voters approved $3 billion in bonds to pay for research and medical studies using stem cells.

What if it passes?

Prop 14 would allow the state to sell $5.5 billion in new bonds to pay for more stem cell research and medical treatments. $1.5 billion from the bonds would go to research and treatment for brain diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. 

Budget effect

The total cost to repay the bonds plus interest would be around $7.8 billion. The state would pay around $260 million each year for the next 30 years. If the state’s stem cell research leads to new medical treatments, the state could get some money to use for patients’ treatments. The amount it might receive is not clear.

People FOR say

  • Stem cell bonds have led to new medical treatments and important research that should be continued.
  • Prop 14 provides money that will help fight many serious diseases, including cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

People AGAINST say

  • We should not be spending billions of dollars on Prop 14 when so many people are out of work.
  • The federal government and private groups are already helping pay for important stem cell research.

Pros & Cons — Unbiased explanation with arguments for and against

Information provided by League of Women Voters of California Education Fund

The Question

Should California sell $5.5 billion in new bonds to continue funding grants for research and development of stem cell treatments?

The Situation

In 2004 voters approved Proposition 71 which added a provision to the California Constitution allowing stem cell research. The measure also created the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (“CIRM”) and allowed the State to sell $3 billion in bonds to fund CIRM grants and operations. To date, the CIRM has awarded approximately $2.7 billion in grants. Funded projects have included stem cell research, developing potential treatments for many diseases using stem cells and undertaking clinical trials for new potential treatments. Grant funds also have supported construction of new research facilities and research internships. Grant recipients who license or sell their inventions are required to share a portion of the income from these inventions with the State.

As of June 2020, almost all the funds from the sale of the bonds authorized by Prop 71 have been spent. Only approximately $30 million remains available for grants and the CIRM needs additional funds to continue its operations and support for stem cell research.

The Proposal

Prop 14 would allow the State to sell $5.5 billion in new bonds to continue the CIRM’s funding of stem cell and other medical research and training, stem cell therapy and delivery of treatments to patients, research facility construction and administrative expenses. Prop 14 also sets limits on the bond funds that can be used for administrative purposes and targets funding for research and treatment of certain diseases. $1.5 billion is set aside to research and develop treatments for diseases affecting the brain and central nervous system, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, among others. It limits administrative costs to 7.5% of bond funds.

Prop 14 also provides for the phased sale of bonds over 11 years, or about $540 million per year. Prop 14 also would make several changes to the CIRM and its governing board. The changes are intended to expand patient access to stem cell treatment.

Fiscal effect

Total costs are estimated at $7.8 billion over a 30 year period, including $5.5 billion in principal and $2.3 billion in interest to repay bondholders. This would average about $260 million per year. The State also is entitled to revenue from new inventions resulting from research or treatments funded by the CIRM. The future revenue source is uncertain. There could be indirect fiscal effects for some health care programs, such as Medical, but the net fiscal impact is unknown.

Supporters say

  • California’s stem cell funding has led to significant advances in treatments and cures for many diseases, including over 2,900 medical discoveries.
  • Prop 14 is supported by over 70 patient advocate organizations. It will increase patient access and affordable treatments and provide patients, their families and caregivers with financial assistance.
  • Prop 14 will contribute to the rebound of California’s economy. Funding to date has generated about $10.7 billion in economic stimulus.

Opponents say

  • California cannot afford the $7.3 billion for Prop 14 bonds particularly in the middle of an economic crisis and repayment of the bonds will increase taxes.
  • Previous funding has not yielded the promised results for treatments or economic benefits. Private investors and companies have made great strides in stem cell research and cures.
  • Independent analysts and news outlets have questioned the management, integrity and transparency of the CIRM. 

Measure Details — Official information about this measure

YES vote means

A YES vote on this measure means: The state could sell $5.5 billion in general obligation bonds primarily for stem cell research and the development of new medical treatments in California.

NO vote means

A NO vote on this measure means: The state could not sell $5.5 billion in general obligation bonds primarily for stem cell research and the development of new medical treatments in California.

Summary

Source: California State Attorney General - Official Voter Information Guide p. 16

OFFICIAL TITLE AND SUMMARY
PREPARED BY THE ATTORNEY GENERAL

PROPOSITION 14.
AUTHORIZES BONDS CONTINUING STEM CELL RESEARCH. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

  • Authorizes $5.5 billion in state general obligation bonds to fund grants from the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine to educational, nonprofit, and private entities for: stem cell and other medical research, including training; stem cell therapy development and delivery; research facility construction; and associated administrative expenses. 
  • Dedicates $1.5 billion to research and therapy for Alzheimer's, Parkinson’s, stroke, epilepsy, and other brain and central nervous system diseases and conditions.
  • Appropriates General Fund moneys to pay bond debt service.
  • Expands programs promoting stem cell and other medical research, therapy development and delivery, and student and physician training and fellowships. 

SUMMARY OF LEGISLATIVE ANALYST’S ESTIMATE OF NET STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT FISCAL IMPACT:

  • Increased state costs to repay bonds estimated at about $260 million per year over the next roughly 30 years. 

Summary of State Costs

New Borrowing
Principal : $5.5 billion
Interest : $2.3 billion       
Total Estimated Cost : $7.8 billion

Payments
Average annual cost : $260 million
Assumed payment period : 30 years
Source of payments : Primarily General Fund tax revenue

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=16

Background

Source: California Legislative Analyst's Office - Official Voter Information Guide pp. 16-18

BACKGROUND


Researchers Use Stem Cells to Study and Treat Many Diseases. Stem cells are certain types of cells that exist within humans. Researchers are interested in stem cells for their potential to regenerate cells, tissues, and organs, thereby potentially helping to treat or cure certain diseases. Researchers engaged in “regenerative medicine” are focused on addressing many diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, HIV/AIDS, stroke, diabetes, and cancer.

Voters Approved Earlier Stem Cell Ballot Measure. In 2004, voters approved Proposition 71, which added a provision to the State Constitution affirming the right of researchers in California to conduct stem cell research. The measure also created the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), primarily for the purpose of providing grants to universities and other entities in California to support stem cell research, development of new treatments, clinical trials, new research facilities, and other related activities. The measure also established (1) a governing board to adopt CIRM policies and allocate grant funds, (2) three advisory working groups to help guide the governing board on certain matters, and (3) an independent oversight committee to review CIRM’s finances.

Measure Allowed State to Issue General Obligation Bonds. Proposition 71 allowed the state to sell $3 billion in general obligation bonds, which are a form of borrowing. The state sold the bonds to investors, and the money generated from these sales funded CIRM grants and operations. After selling bonds, the state has been repaying investors with interest over many years. As is typically the case with these kinds of bonds, the state has made most debt payments from the General Fund—the state’s main operating account, which pays for education, prisons, health care, and other public services. The measure required that a small amount of interest be paid by funds from the bond sales. (For more information on the state's use of bonds, see "Overview of State Bond Debt" later in this guide.)

Grants Have Funded Several Purposes. Figure 1 shows how CIRM has used its grant funding. Funded projects have involved conducting basic science research (such as laboratory research on stem cells), developing potential treatments, and undertaking clinical trials. Grant funds also have supported other activities, including construction of new research facilities and research internships for college students. The University of California has received the greatest amount of grant funding, followed by private nonprofit universities and institutions (such as Stanford University). In addition to receiving a grant from CIRM, many grant recipients receive additional funding from other sources for their projects. Other common fund sources are industry contributions, private donations, and federal grants.

[NOTE: Since Voter's Edge cannot display images, this link will take you to page 2 of the Legislative Analyst's report, which contains a pie chart of grant disbursements:
https://lao.ca.gov/ballot/2020/Prop14-110320.pdf#page=2]

Grant Recipients Are Required to Share Invention–Related Income With the State. Some stem cell research can lead to new inventions, including new medical technologies and treatments. Proposition 71 required grant recipients who license or sell their inventions to share a portion of the resulting income with the state. The state's share of the income is deposited into the General Fund and may be used to support any state program. Over the years, CIRM's governing board has developed rules for how income revenue is shared with the state. The state began receiving income from CIRM–funded inventions in 2017. To date, these inventions have provided a total of approximately $350,000 to the state.

CIRM Has Spent Nearly All Available Funds. As of June 2020, CIRM had spent most of its Proposition 71 funds. According to CIRM, around $30 million remains available for grants. As it nears the end of its funding, CIRM has been decreasing its staffing. The institute currently employs 35 full–time staff, down from its peak of over 50 full–time staff. It plans to maintain some staff for the next few years as remaining projects are completed.

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=16

Impartial analysis / Proposal

Source: California State Legislative Analyst's Office - Official Voter Information Guide pp. 18-19

PROPOSAL

Authorizes New Bonds for Stem Cell Activities.  Proposition 14 allows the state to sell $5.5 billion in general obligation bonds. The bonds primarily would fund additional grants to support research and the development of treatments (including clinical trials) for many diseases. The proposition sets aside at least $1.5 billion specifically to research and develop treatments for diseases affecting the brain and central nervous system (such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson’s disease). The proposition directs CIRM to allocate a small share of grant funding for training opportunities for students at the California State University and the California Community Colleges, as well as a small share for helping to establish and support facilities focused on research and clinical trials. For some types of grants, CIRM would be required to ensure grant recipients are located across the state and prioritize applicants that offer matching funds. The proposition allows CIRM to spend no more than 7.5 percent of bond funds on its administrative costs. 

Establishes Certain Rules Relating to the Bonds. The proposition limits the amount of bonds the state could sell to $540 million per year, thereby spreading out bond sales over at least 11 years. For the first five years after the proposition is approved, the state would make interest payments using funds from the bond sales, thereby reducing the amount of bond funding available for research projects. Beginning January 1, 2026, the state would no longer use funds from bond sales to make interest payments. Instead, the state would make remaining debt payments from the General Fund. 

Makes Numerous Changes to CIRM. Most notably, the proposition makes several changes intended to improve patient access to stem cell treatments. The proposition allows CIRM to hire up to 15 full–time employees specifically for developing policies and programs relating to improving access to and affordability of treatments for patients. (The institute would be allowed up to 70 full–time employees for other operational purposes.) A new advisory working group of experts would support CIRM's governing board in these matters. Further, any invention-related revenue that is deposited into the General Fund would be used to help pay for patients' regenerative medicine treatments. Among various other changes, the proposition also increases the number of members on CIRM’s governing board from 29 to 35.

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=18

Financial effect

Source: California Legislative Analyst's Office - Official Voter Guide

FISCAL EFFECTS

Total Estimated State Costs of $7.8 Billion.  The cost to repay the bonds authorized by this proposition depends on various factors, such as the interest rates on the bonds and the time period over which they are repaid. We estimate the total cost to pay off the bonds would be $7.8 billion—$5.5 billion for the principal and $2.3 billion for the interest. State costs would average about $260 million per year for about 30 years. This amount is less than 1 percent of the state's current General Fund budget.

Difficult to Estimate Invention–Related Income Available for Patients' Treatment Costs. The amount of revenue from new inventions that would be available to the state for helping to cover costs for patients' regenerative medicine treatments is uncertain. Many times, research does not lead to an invention. Also, a significant amount of time typically passes from starting a research project to licensing or selling an associated invention. To date, the state has collected a few hundred thousand dollars in invention–related income. Past revenue collections, however, might not accurately predict future revenue.

Other Possible Fiscal Effects. The proposition could result in numerous indirect effects on state and local governments. For example, if the proposition were to result in new treatments, state and local government costs for some programs such as Medi–Cal, the state's subsidized health care program for low–income people, could be affected. The net fiscal impact of the indirect effects of this proposition is unknown.

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=19

Published Arguments — Arguments for and against the ballot measure

Arguments FOR

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency.

Prop 14 funds further development of treatments and cures for chronic, life-threatening diseases like Cancer, Alzheimer's, Heart Disease, Diabetes, Parkinson's, Kidney Disease. Builds on 2,900 medical discoveries; increases patient access & affordability; stimulates California's economy; ensures strict accountability. Doctors, Nobel Prize Scientists, over 70 leading Patient Advocate Organizations, urge YES on 14.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION FOR:
YES on 14: Californians for Stem Cell Research, Treatments and Cures
P.O. Box 20368
Stanford, CA 94309
YESon14@CAforCures.com
www.YESon14.com

— Source: California Secretary of State / Official Voter Information Guide p. 8

Arguments FOR

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency.

ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF PROPOSITION 14 

PROPOSITION 14: STEM CELL TREATMENTS, CURES, AND SAVING LIVES. Nearly half of all California families include a child or adult with medical conditions who could benefit from Stem Cell research, treatments, and cures.

Prop. 14 provides continued funding to develop treatments, advance clinical trials and achieve new scientific breakthroughs for California’s patients with Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, HIV/AIDS, ALS, MS, Sickle Cell Disease, Lung Diseases, Kidney Disease, Bubble Baby Disease, Age-Related Blindness and Genetic Blindness, Epilepsy, Stroke, Schizophrenia, Autism, other Mental Health and Brain Conditions, and Infectious Diseases like COVID-19.

BUILDING ON CONTINUING SUCCESS: 92 FDA-APPROVED CLINICAL TRIALS / 2,900 MEDICAL DISCOVERIES TO DATE. California’s original Stem Cell funding, which runs out this year, has already led to significant progress in the development of treatments and cures, including 92 FDAapproved clinical trials for chronic disease and injuries, over 2,900 medical discoveries, and demonstrated benefits for patients and research on chronic diseases including: Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Conditions, Blindness, HIV/AIDS, ALS, Children with Immune Deficiencies, Paralysis, and Kidney Disease.

SUCCESS STORIES OF CALIFORNIA PATIENTS TREATED INCLUDE: • A high school student paralyzed in a diving accident has regained upper body function. • A mother blinded by a genetic disease is regaining her eyesight. • A cure was discovered for a fatal disease that causes children to be born without functioning immune systems. • FDA-approved treatments for two types of fatal blood cancers. Hear from more patients at www.YESon14.com/successes

SUPPORTED BY OVER 70 PATIENT ADVOCATE ORGANIZATIONS. A YES vote on Prop. 14 is endorsed by the University of California, NOBEL PRIZE WINNERS, leading patient and medical science advocates, and more than 70 PATIENT ADVOCATE ORGANIZATIONS, including: American Association for Cancer Research • American Diabetes Association • Leukemia & Lymphoma Society • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation • The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research • ALS Association, Golden West Chapter • CURE—Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy • One Mind • Immune Deficiency Foundation • Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement • Alzheimer’s Los Angeles • Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation for Paralysis • Cystic Fibrosis Research, Inc. • Arthritis Foundation • Sickle Cell Disease Foundation of California • Foundation for Fighting Blindness • San Francisco AIDS Foundation

“Prop. 14 builds on California’s progress to date, helping to accelerate medical breakthroughs out of the lab and into clinical trials, where they can help improve and save patient lives.”—Dr. Adriana Padilla, Fresno

INCREASES PATIENT ACCESS & AFFORDABILITY. Dedicates “The Treatment and Cures Accessibility and Affordability Working Group” experts to dramatically expand access to clinical trials and new therapies, make treatments and cures more affordable for Californians, and provide patients, their families, and caregivers with financial assistance.

ECONOMIC AND JOBS RECOVERY STIMULUS. New revenues, economic activity and jobs are generated by this funding that will contribute to California’s economic recovery. There are no State bond payments during the first five years; and, supporting California’s Stem Cell program will only cost the State an average of less than $5 per person annually.

ENSURES STRICT ACCOUNTABILITY & TRANSPARENCY. California’s Controller chairs The Citizens Financial Accountability Oversight Committee, which reviews independent, financial, and performance audits, of the funding Institute. The Institute complies with California’s Open Meeting Act, Public Records Act, and Political Reform Act.

Chronic diseases, conditions and injuries are cutting lives short, and costing Californians billions in healthcare costs. We must continue our investment, developing Stem Cell treatments to improve the health and reduce the suffering of millions of Californians.

VOTE YES ON 14. IT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE OR THE LIFE OF SOMEONE YOU LOVE. www.YESon14.com

ANTONI RIBAS, M.D., Ph.D., President
American Association for Cancer Research

CYNTHIA E. MUÑOZ, Ph.D., MPH, President
American Diabetes Association-Los Angeles

ROBERT A. HARRINGTON, M.D., Chairman
Department of Medicine, Stanford University 

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=20

— Source: California Secretary of State / Official Voter Information Guide pp. 20-21

Arguments AGAINST

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency.

No on Prop. 14. Would commit $7.8 billion we cannot afford during this economic and budget crisis. Funds a state agency with management challenges and poor results after $3 billion already spent. Servicing debt of Prop. 14 could increase pressure for higher taxes or layoffs of nurses, first responders and other public employees.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AGAINST:
John Seiler
P.O. Box 25683 
Santa Ana, CA 92799
(714) 376-0109
writejohnseiler@gmail.com

— Source: California Secretary of State / Official Voter Information Guide p. 8

Arguments AGAINST

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency.

ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 14 

WE CAN’T AFFORD TO WASTE BILLIONS

In the middle of an economic crisis, with soaring unemployment and budget shortfalls in the tens of billions of dollars, we don’t have money to burn.

We simply cannot afford the $5 billion that proponents of Prop. 14 are asking for.

And that’s on top of the nearly $3 billion this troubled state agency has spent over the past 15 years—with poor results.

After “an extensive analysis” of spending by the State agency handing out billions in grants, the San Francisco Chronicle concluded: “The predicted financial windfall has not materialized.” Only a few federally approved therapies have resulted.

Don’t believe the “economic impact” numbers from the proponents of Prop. 14.

That “impact” includes:

  • More than $100 million in grants to private companies headquartered in other states.
  • More than $2.4 million in salary over the past decade to the part-time vice chairman of the board, a former California legislator who is neither a doctor nor a medical scientist.

Outrageous.

PROP. 14 FUNDS A BUREAUCRACY WITH SERIOUS PROBLEMS

Some have questioned “the integrity and independence” of the state agency overseeing these funds.

The Little Hoover Commission branded Robert Klein, the former chairman of the agency’s board, “a lightning rod for calls for more accountability.”

The Center for Society and Genetics in Berkeley has concluded that none of the flaws in the original stem cell initiative have been addressed in Prop. 14. In fact, they conclude, the problems are even worse.

OTHERS CAN DO THIS JOB BETTER

The National Institute of Health provides $1.5 billion a year in grants to fund the same type of research.

Private investors and companies, including many in California, have made great strides in using stem cells to cure diseases—using private funds, not tax dollars.

And don’t be misled by the handful of grants this agency has made in recent months to researchers working on COVID-19. It’s an obvious attempt—after spending billions on other priorities—to mislead voters in the middle of this pandemic.

PROP. 14 MEANS HIGHER TAXES, LAYOFFS—OR BOTH

Read the nearby summary, which quotes the estimate by the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst: “State costs of $7.8 billion to pay off principal ($5.5 billion) and interest ($2.3 billion) on the bonds.”

Paying back Prop.14’s costs of $7.8 billion could mean huge tax increases—at a time when our economy is on its knees.

Or laying off thousands of nurses and other heroes who do the real work of keeping California healthy.

VOTE NO ON PROP. 14.
WE CAN’T AFFORD TO WASTE BILLIONS

VINCENT FORTANASCE, M.D.

PATRICK JAMES BAGGOT, M.D. 

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=21

— Source: California Secretary of State / Official Voter Information Guide pp. 20-21

Replies to Arguments FOR

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency.

REBUTTAL TO ARGUMENT IN FAVOR OF PROPOSITION 14

VOTE NO ON PROP. 14

HUGE COSTS

As you can see from reading the ballot argument above, proponents are attempting to minimize the cost of this initiative.

The total cost is actually $7.3 billion—a huge sum during this moment of economic crisis, with soaring unemployment and budget shortfalls.

FAILED PROMISES

Proponents are making empty promises about revenues and jobs.

The San Francisco Chronicle examined similar promises made to California voters years ago—and concluded the “predicted windfall has not materialized.”

Independent experts and news outlets have questioned the management and transparency record of the state bureaucracy that would spend the billions authorized by Prop. 14.

Only a few federally approved therapies have resulted from the $3 billion this state bureaucracy has spent to date.

NOT THE ANSWER

Medical research is important. We all agree there is a need to find cures and treatments for diseases afflicting so many.

But Prop. 14 is not the answer.

The federal government and private investors are spending billions to find cures.

The State of California taxpayer has done enough.

Vote NO on Prop. 14.

VINCENT FORTANASCE, M.D.

PATRICK JAMES BAGGOT, M.D.

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=20

— Source: California Secretary of State / Official Voter Information Guide pp. 20-21

Replies to Arguments AGAINST

Arguments are the opinions of the authors, and have not been checked for accuracy by any official agency.

REBUTTAL TO ARGUMENT AGAINST PROPOSITION 14 

Nobel Prize winning medical researchers, doctors, and 70 patient advocate organizations have studied Prop. 14 and urge A YES VOTE.

  • Stem Cell Research is a critical area of medical advancement that is discovering therapy breakthroughs and cures for currently incurable diseases and injuries.
  • The United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) has partnered with California’s Stem Cell Funding Institute to advance therapies because of California’s track record of success.
  • Funding research for new therapies and cures is from bonds, not a tax. Average cost to State equals less than $5 per person annually, with no state payments until 2026, the 6th year of California’s economic recovery.
  • These new treatments and cures could restore health and reduce healthcare costs for Californians.
  • California funding is essential; funding from Washington, DC is unpredictable and unreliable.

Opponents ignore years of the funding institute’s progress, including over 2,900 medical discoveries and 92 FDAApproved Clinical Trials, and high marks from the Citizen’s Financial Accountability Oversight Committee, Chaired by California’s Controller.

ECONOMIC JOB RECOVERY STIMULUS—PROVEN HISTORY

The University of Southern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics issued a 2019 report validating hundreds of millions of dollars in new revenue, $10.7 billion in economic stimulus, and tens of thousands of new jobs, created by California’s Stem Cell funding. This history demonstrates Prop. 14 will provide an Economic Job Recovery Stimulus.

SUPPORTED BY 70 PATIENT ADVOCATE ORGANIZATIONS, THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, AND SCIENTISTS, INCLUDING: American Association for Cancer Research • American Diabetes Association • Leukemia & Lymphoma Society • Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation • ALS Association, Golden West Chapter • CURE—Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy • One Mind • Immune Deficiency Foundation • Beyond Type I • Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement • Alzheimer’s Los Angeles • Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation for Paralysis • Cystic Fibrosis Research, Inc. • Arthritis Foundation • Sickle Cell Disease Foundation of California • Foundation for Fighting Blindness • San Francisco AIDS Foundation.

VOTE YES ON 14. IT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE OR THE LIFE OF SOMEONE YOU LOVE.

TODD SHERER, Ph.D., CEO
The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research

LAWRENCE GOLDSTEIN, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor
Shiley—Marcos Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, University of California, San Diego

TRACY GRIKSCHEIT, M.D., Chief of Pediatric Surgery
Children’s Hospital Los Angeles 

https://vig.cdn.sos.ca.gov/2020/general/pdf/complete-vig.pdf#page=21

— Source: California Secretary of State / Official Voter Information Guide pp. 20-21

Who gave money?

Contributions

Yes on Proposition 14

Total money raised: $15,076,712
Bar graph showing total amount relative to total amount for this entire campaign.

No on Proposition 14

Total money raised: $250
Bar graph showing total amount relative to total amount for this entire campaign.

Below are the top 10 contributors that gave money to committees supporting or opposing the ballot measures.

Yes on Proposition 14

1
ROBERT N. KLEIN II AND AFFILIATED ENTITY KLEIN FINANCIAL CORPORATION
$5,274,852
2
DOLBY, DAGMAR
$2,059,000
3
JDRF
$1,000,000
4
SANFORD, T. DENNY
$975,000
5
DOERR, ANN HOWLAND
$950,000
5
DOERR, III, L. JOHN
$950,000
5
TSUKAMOTO, ANN S.
$950,000
6
Open Philanthropy
$580,000
7
JOHNSON, FRANKLIN 'PITCH'
$500,299
8
BYERS, BROOK H.
$480,000

No on Proposition 14

1
California Pro Life Council
$250

More information about contributions

Yes on Proposition 14

By State:

California 86.90%
New York 6.63%
Arizona 6.47%
86.90%

By Size:

Large contributions (100.00%)
Small contributions (0.00%)
100.00%

By Type:

From organizations (12.58%)
From individuals (87.42%)
12.58%87.42%

No on Proposition 14

By State:

California 100.00%
100.00%

By Size:

Large contributions (100.00%)
Small contributions (0.00%)
100.00%

By Type:

From organizations (100.00%)
From individuals (0.00%)
100.00%

More information

Videos (6)

— September 9, 2020 KCET
Prop 14 approves $5.5 billion in bonds to continue stem cell research in California. The money would be given out as grants to various educational, nonprofit and private entities. It would also designate $1.5 billion to research treatments for diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and dementia.
— October 4, 2020 League of Women Voters of San Diego
Ballot measures can sometimes feel like trick questions. We at the League of Women Voters are dedicated to providing non-partisan "prop talks" to help break down each measure. We will present the pros and cons of how these policies will impact your day to day life.
— October 1, 2020 Los Angeles Times
If Proposition 14 passes, it would allow the state to borrow more money to continue stem cell research at the state government level. It would include some rules for how those funds are spent.
Si se aprueba la Proposición 14, permitiría al estado pedir más dinero prestado para continuar la investigación con células madre a nivel de gobierno estatal. Incluiría algunas reglas sobre cómo se gastan esos fondos.
— October 11, 2020 League of Women Voters of Cupertino-Sunnyvale
This video covers all 12 Propositions, Measure 14 starts at time: 0:14
— October 18, 2020 League of Women Voters of Southwest Santa Clara Valley

Events (6)

Contact Info

Yes on Proposition 14
YES on 14: Californians for Stem Cell Research, Treatments and Cures
Email YESon14@CAforCures.com
Phone: (888) 307-3550
Address:
P.O. Box 20368
Stanford, CA 94309
No on Proposition 14
No on 14
Contact Name:

John Seiler

Email writejohnseiler@gmail.com
Phone: (714) 376-0109
Address:
P.O. Box 25683
Santa Ana, CA 92799
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Yes on Proposition 14

Organizations (203)

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